Blog Contributors

Ivan Flis

Author image for Ivan Flis    			    			Ivan Flis is a PhD student in History and Philosophy of Science at the Descartes Centre, Utrecht University. His research focuses on quantitative methodology in psychology, its history and application, and its relation to theory construction in psychological research. He has been an editor of JEPS for three years in the previous mandates.

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What Do Whigs Have To Do With History of Psychology? on Thursday, January 30th, 2014

The state of Open Access in Europe – Horizon 2020 on Monday, October 1st, 2012

The State of Open Access in Europe – Finch Report on Wednesday, August 1st, 2012

Self-archiving and psychology journals on Sunday, June 10th, 2012

Research oriented social networking? on Thursday, May 10th, 2012

Podcast with Nick Shockey: Open Access and psychology students on Tuesday, May 1st, 2012

The implications of bite-size science on Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

ACTA, SOPA, PIPA, RWA and what do they have to do with psychologists on Monday, February 20th, 2012

What happens to studies that accept the null hypothesis? on Sunday, January 1st, 2012

Who publishes the most reputable journals in psychology? on Thursday, November 10th, 2011

Martin Vasilev

Author image for Martin Vasilev    			    			Martin Vasilev is an Editor in JEPS. He is a final year undergraduate student of Psychology at the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, and the author of some of the most popular posts at the JEPS Bulletin (see for example, his post on writing literature reviews, which was reprinted in the MBA Edge, a magazine for Malaysian prospective postgraduate students).

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What Are The Most Common APA Style Mistakes Done By Students? on Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

How to write a good title for journal articles on Saturday, September 1st, 2012

APA Style: Abbreviations on Saturday, March 10th, 2012

How to critically evaluate internet-based sources? on Saturday, August 20th, 2011

How to write a good literature review article? on Wednesday, July 20th, 2011

Zorana Zupan

Author image for Zorana Zupan    			    			
    		University of Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro
Graduated from University of Belgrade, Dipl. in Psychology
Msc Research in Psychology
Research interests: Developmental Psychology, Developmental psychopathology, Cognitive Psychology

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Perfect references in no time: An introduction to free referencing software on Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

How to critically evaluate the quality of a research article? on Monday, August 1st, 2011

Deirdre Walsh

Deirdre Walsh is a doctoral student in Counselling Psychology at Trinity College, Dublin. She is a recent MSc Clinical Child Psychology graduate of Anglia Ruskin University, United Kingdom. She has various experiences conducting psychology studies using qualitative research methods. She aspires to be a counselling psychologist, and hopes to apply the knowledge gained from her research experiences into practice.

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The journey towards discovering people: Why I love qualitative research on Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Zoey Hudson

Zoey Hudson graduated from Anglia Ruskin University with a BSc (Hons) Psychology in 2012. She is currently working with Dr. Richard Piech researching on reciprocity in the trust. When Zoey is not at work, she is volunteering for a charity, helping them to find means of funding. Rationality is a particular interest of Zoey’s and one which she would like to pursue further research in. As applying for financial funding is necessary to conduct research, Zoey hopes that her work and volunteering experiences will be useful in her career in psychology research.

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Life is a box of chocolates on Saturday, October 20th, 2012

Maris Vainre

Managing and organising literature on Friday, April 20th, 2012

Tips for effective literature search on Tuesday, April 10th, 2012

APA style: How to format the references list? on Friday, January 20th, 2012

How to format headings in APA Style? on Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

Common mistakes made in APA style on Sunday, November 20th, 2011

What makes a presentation good? on Saturday, October 1st, 2011

Tomatoes against procrastination on Saturday, September 10th, 2011

Lost in translating? on Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

Can you find an article in 5 sec? The world of DOIs on Friday, June 10th, 2011

How to make (scientific) texts sound professional? on Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

Chris Noone

Author image for Chris Noone    			    			Chris Noone is a PhD student at the School of Psychology at the National University of Ireland, Galway. His research focuses on the effects of mood on higher-order cognition. He is the Member Representative Coordinator on the Board of Management of EFPSA.

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Student Action for Open Access on Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

Replication Studies: It’s Time to Clean Up Your Act, Psychologists! on Wednesday, January 30th, 2013

The state of Open Access in Europe – Right to Research Coalition on Monday, August 20th, 2012

Yee Row Liew

Author image for Yee Row Liew    			    			Yee Row Liew is an Editor of the JEPS Bulletin, who has a wide research background and experience that range from plant genetics to psychology. Having completed her postgraduate study just recently in Psychological Research Methods from Anglia Ruskin University, United Kingdom, she is now working as a research assistant at the Global Sustainability Institute. She hopes to gain further knowledge in the study of emotion, cognition, and motivation, in pursuit of her love for scientific research.

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Confessions of a Research Blog Editor on Monday, April 15th, 2013

Say again?: Scientific writing and publishing in non-English speaking countries on Sunday, December 30th, 2012

What makes a good research question? on Monday, September 10th, 2012

Sina Scherer

Author image for Sina Scherer    			    			As being part of EFPSA's JEPS team, Sina Scherer works as JEPS Bulletin's editor and is currently enrolled in the last year of her Master programme in Work and Organizational Psychology at the Westfälische Wilhelmsuniversität Münster. Her fields of interest cover the areas of Intercultural Psychology, Personality and Organizational Psychology such as Health Psychology.

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How to Collect Data Effectively? An Overview of the Best Online Survey Providers on Friday, November 15th, 2013

The structure of an APA research paper on Thursday, November 15th, 2012

The transformation of science on Friday, August 10th, 2012

Bias in psychology: Bring in all significant results on Friday, June 1st, 2012

Scaring European developments threaten Open Access on Sunday, April 1st, 2012

A revolution in scientific publishing? on Friday, February 10th, 2012

Journals in Psychology on Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

How to search for literature? on Saturday, December 10th, 2011

Lessons from a published fake study on Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Written by the hands of a ghost on Tuesday, September 20th, 2011

Pedro Almeida

Author image for Pedro Almeida    			    			Pedro Almeida is a graduate student at the University of Coimbra, Portugal. His main research interests are group development and intergroup relations. He is an Editor and Webmaster for the Journal of European Psychology Students (JEPS).

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The Best of JEPS Bulletin in 2013 on Thursday, December 26th, 2013

Looking for New Contributors on Monday, September 23rd, 2013

Why We Publish: The Past, Present, and Future of Science Communication on Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

The origins of APA style (and why there are so many rules) on Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Peter Edelsbrunner

Author image for Peter Edelsbrunner    			    			Peter Edelsbrunner is a PhD student at the Institute for Behavioural Sciences at the ETH Zurich. He completed his Master's degree in Psychology at the University of Graz. He is interested in conceptual change, reasoning processes, and strutural equation modelling. With his strong methodological background, he hopes to combine both cognitive theory and psychometrics in his future research pursuits.

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Introducing jamovi: Free and Open Statistical Software Combining Ease of Use with the Power of R on Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

Structural equation modeling: What is it, what does it have in common with hippie music, and why does it eat cake to get rid of measurement error? on Monday, December 14th, 2015

Bayesian Statistics: What is it and Why do we Need it? on Monday, November 17th, 2014

Advice for the Next Generation of Researchers in Psychology from an Experienced Editor on Friday, November 30th, 2012

Research as an international project on Thursday, December 1st, 2011

Julia Ouzia

Author image for Julia Ouzia    			    			Julia Ouzia is a German national who has lived in the United Kingdom for over seven years. Since then she has completed a Bachelor's degree in Psychology and a Master's degree in Clinical Child Psychology. Julia is currently interested in bilingual learning and cognition doing a PhD in Brain and Cognition at Anglia Ruskin University. She has also been part of the Executive Board and the Board of Management of EFPSA.

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Keep calm and be creative: Use mixed methods! on Wednesday, October 10th, 2012

How to be an academic rock star via poster presentation on Friday, July 20th, 2012

In the shoes of a peer-reviewer on Thursday, March 1st, 2012

Accelerating Psychological Science with Large-Scale Collaborations

Science is the collaborative attempt to understand ourselves and the world around us better by gathering and evaluating evidence. Ironically enough, we are pretty bad at evaluating evidence. Luckily, others rejoice in pointing out our flaws. It is this reciprocal corrective process which is at the core of science, and the reason why it works so well. Working collaboratively helps us catch and correct each other’s mistakes.
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Fabian Dablander

Fabian Dablander just finished his Masters in Cognitive Science at the University of Tübingen. He is interested in innovative ways of data collection, Bayesian statistics, open science, and effective altruism. You can find him on Twitter @fdabl.

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How to stop being busy and become productive

With the rise of social media, potential distractions have risen to unseen levels; they dominate our daily lives. Do you check Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, or Email on a constant basis? Do you have an embarrassing relationship with your alarm clock’s snooze button? Do you pass on social invites, telling other people that you are too busy? As a generation, we have lost the ability to focus sharply on the task at hand; instead, we work on a multitude of things simultaneously, lamenting that we do not achieve what we seek to achieve. (more…)

Fabian Dablander

Fabian Dablander just finished his Masters in Cognitive Science at the University of Tübingen. He is interested in innovative ways of data collection, Bayesian statistics, open science, and effective altruism. You can find him on Twitter @fdabl.

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Are You Registering That? An Interview with Prof. Chris Chambers

There is no panacea for bad science, but if there were, it would certainly resemble Registered Reports. Registered Reports are a novel publishing format in which authors submit only the introduction, methods, and planned analyses without actually having collected the data. Thus, peer-review only focuses on the soundness of the research proposal and is not contingent on the “significance” of the results (Chambers, 2013). In one strike, this simple idea combats publication bias, researchers’ degrees of freedom, makes apparent the distinction between exploratory and confirmatory research, and calms the researcher’s mind. There are a number of journals offering Registered Reports, and this is arguable the most important step journals can take to push psychological science forward (see also King et al., 2016). For a detailed treatment of Registered Reports, see here, here, here, and Chambers (2015). (more…)

Fabian Dablander

Fabian Dablander just finished his Masters in Cognitive Science at the University of Tübingen. He is interested in innovative ways of data collection, Bayesian statistics, open science, and effective altruism. You can find him on Twitter @fdabl.

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Not solely about that Bayes: Interview with Prof. Eric-Jan Wagenmakers

Last summer saw the publication of the most important work in psychology in decades: the Reproducibility Project (Open Science Collaboration, 2015; see here and here for context). It stirred up the community, resulting in many constructive discussions but also in verbally violent disagreement. What unites all parties, however, is the call for more transparency and openness in research.

Eric-Jan “EJ” Wagenmakers has argued for pre-registration of research (Wagenmakers et al., 2012; see also here) and direct replications (e.g., Boekel et al., 2015; Wagenmakers et al., 2015), for a clearer demarcation of exploratory and confirmatory research (de Groot, 1954/2013), and for a change in the way we analyze our data (Wagenmakers et al., 2011; Wagenmakers et al., in press). (more…)

Fabian Dablander

Fabian Dablander just finished his Masters in Cognitive Science at the University of Tübingen. He is interested in innovative ways of data collection, Bayesian statistics, open science, and effective altruism. You can find him on Twitter @fdabl.

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Replicability and Registered Reports

Last summer saw the publication of a monumental piece of work: the reproducibility project (Open Science Collaboration, 2015). In a huge community effort, over 250 researchers directly replicated 100 experiments initially conducted in 2008. Only 39% of the replications were significant at the 5% level. Average effect size estimates were halved. The study design itself—conducting direct replications on a large scale—as well as its outcome are game-changing to the way we view our discipline, but students might wonder: what game were we playing before, and how did we get here? (more…)

Fabian Dablander

Fabian Dablander just finished his Masters in Cognitive Science at the University of Tübingen. He is interested in innovative ways of data collection, Bayesian statistics, open science, and effective altruism. You can find him on Twitter @fdabl.

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Bayesian Statistics: Why and How

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Bayesian statistics is what all the cool kids are talking about these days. Upon closer inspection, this does not come as a surprise. In contrast to classical statistics, Bayesian inference is principled, coherent, unbiased, and addresses an important question in science: in which of my hypothesis should I believe in, and how strongly, given the collected data?  (more…)

Fabian Dablander

Fabian Dablander just finished his Masters in Cognitive Science at the University of Tübingen. He is interested in innovative ways of data collection, Bayesian statistics, open science, and effective altruism. You can find him on Twitter @fdabl.

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Crowdsource your research with style

Would you like to collect data quick and efficiently? Would you like to have a sample that generalizes beyond western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic participants? While you acknowledge social media as a powerful means to distribute your studies, you feel that there must be a “better way”? Then this practical introduction to crowdsourcing is exactly what you need. I will show you how to use Crowdflower, a crowdsourcing platform to attract participants from all over the world to take part in your experiments. However, before we get too excited, let’s quickly go through the relevant terminology. (more…)

Fabian Dablander

Fabian Dablander just finished his Masters in Cognitive Science at the University of Tübingen. He is interested in innovative ways of data collection, Bayesian statistics, open science, and effective altruism. You can find him on Twitter @fdabl.

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