Category Archives: Uncategorized

JEPS introduces Registered Reports: Here is how it works

For  more than six years, JEPS has been publishing student research, both in the form of classic Research Articles as well as Literature Reviews. As of April 2016, JEPS offers another publishing format: Registered Reports. In this blog post we explain what Registered Reports are, why they could be interesting for you as a student, and how the review process works.

What are Registered Reports?

Registered Reports are a new form of research article, in which the editorial decision is based on peer review that takes place before data collection.  The review process is thereby divided into two stages: first, your research question and methodology is evaluated, while the data is yet to be collected. In case your Registered Report gets in-principle accepted, you are guaranteed to get your final manuscript published once the data is collected – irrespective of your findings. The second step of the review process then only consists of checking whether you sticked to the methodology you proposed in the Registered Report.

The format of Registered Reports alleviates many problems associated with the current publishing culture, such as the publication bias (see also our previous post): For instance, the decision whether the manuscript gets published is independent of the outcome of statistical tests and therefore publication bias is ruled out. Also, you have to stick to the hypothesis and methodology in your Registered Report and therefore a clear line between exploratory and confirmatory research is maintained.

How does the review process work exactly?

You submit a manuscript consisting of the motivation (introduction) of your research and a detailed description of your hypotheses and the methodology and analysis you intend to use to investigate your hypotheses. Your research plan will then be reviewed by at least two researchers who are experts in your field of psychology. Note that in case Registered Reports Pipeline

Reviewers might ask for revisions of your proposed methodology or analysis. Once all reviewer concerns have been sufficiently addressed, the Registered Report is accepted. This means that you can now collect your data and if you don’t make important changes to your hypotheses and methodology, you are guaranteed publication of  your final manuscript, in format very similar to our Research Articles. Any changes have to be clearly indicated as such. In the second stage of the review process, they will be examined. 

 

Why are Registered Reports interesting for you as a student?

First, you get feedback about your project from experts in your field of psychology. It is very likely that this feedback will make your research stronger and improves your design design. This avoids the situation that you collected your data but then realize during the review process that your methodology is not watertight. Therefore, Registered Reports offer you the chance to rule out methodological problems before collecting the data, possibly saving a lot of headache after. And then having your publication assured.

Second, it takes away the pressure to get “good results” as your results are published regardless of the outcome of your analysis. Further, the fact that your methodology was reviewed before data collection allows to give null-results more weight. Normally, registered reports also include control conditions that help interpreting any (null-) results.

Lastly, Registered Reports enable you to be open and transparent about your scientific practices. When your work is published as a Registered Report, there is a clear separation between confirmatory and exploratory data analysis. While you can change your analysis after your data collection is completed, you have to declare and explain the changes.This adds credibility to the conclusions of your paper and increases the likelihood that future research can build on your work.

And lastly, some practical points

Before you submit, you therefore need to think about, in detail, the research question you want to investigate, and how you plan to analyse your data. This includes a description of your procedures in sufficient detail that others can replicate it and of your proposed sample, a definition of exclusion criteria, a plan of your analysis (incl. Pre-processing steps), and, if you want to do Null Hypothesis significance testing, a power analysis.

Further, you can withdraw your study at any point – however, when this happens after the in-principle acceptance, many journals will publish your work in a special section of the journal called “Withdrawn Reports”. The great thing is that null-result need not to dishearten you – if you received an IPA, your study will still be published – and given that it was pre-registered and pre-peer reviewed, chances are high that others can built on your null-result.

Lastly, you should note that you need not register your work with a journal – you can also register it on the Open Science Framework, for example. In this case, however, your work won’t be reviewed.

Are you as excited about Registered Reports as we are? Are you considering submitting your next project as a Registered Report? Check out our Submission guidelines for further info. Also, please do not hesitate to contact us in case you have any questions!

Suggested Reading

Chambers et al., (2013): Open letter to the Guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2013/jun/05/trust-in-science-study-pre-registration

Gelman & Loken (2013): Garden of forking paths

http://www.stat.columbia.edu/~gelman/research/unpublished/p_hacking.pdf

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Bayesian Statistics: Why and How

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Bayesian statistics is what all the cool kids are talking about these days. Upon closer inspection, this does not come as a surprise. In contrast to classical statistics, Bayesian inference is principled, coherent, unbiased, and addresses an important question in science: in which of my hypothesis should I believe in, and how strongly, given the collected data?  Continue reading

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Interview with Prof. Ralph Hertwig

Ralph Hertwig is director of the Center for Adaptive Rationality at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. He is well known for his interdisciplinary research on cognitive search, judgment, and decision making under risk and uncertainty. To this end, his lab uses a wide array of methods, ranging from experiments, surveys, and computer simulations to neuroscientific tools. 

Ralph Hertwig

What I enjoy most about my job as a researcher … What I most enjoy is the opportunity to team up with people from other fields or schools of thought and produce something I could never have come up with on my own. Continue reading

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What Do Whigs Have To Do With History of Psychology?

The 2013 December issue of the journal Theory & Psychology saw a forceful exchange between Kurt Danziger and Daniel N. Robinson on the nature of psychology’s disciplinary history. For those unfamiliar with the names, both are eminent scholars in (among other things) history of psychology. The exchange boils down to Danziger accusing Robinson of creating a romanticized history of psychology, tying the discipline down to Ancient Greek philosophies.  What Danziger cannot forgive in such a way of writing history of science is the idea of a concept that stays the same throughout history, and then finds its way into psychology. For example (Danziger, 2013, p. 835): “This understanding of psychology’s history has always relied on the belief that the concept of ‘human nature’ represents some historically unchanging essence guaranteeing continuity, no matter how great the gulf that appears to separate the present from the remote past.” Robinson, in turn, answers with two articles in the same issue defending his position with insinuations that Danziger and his supporters are not familiar enough with Aristotle’s body of work to mount such a criticism. His repartees, sans the scholastic posturing, can be summed up well with the sentence (Robinson, 2013a, p. 820): “It is worth noting in order to make clear that the past can be highly instructive without being causally efficacious.” Continue reading

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Looking for New Contributors

bulletin contributorsThe Journal of European Psychology Students’ Bulletin blogs about academic writing, scientific publishing, and essential research skills in the field of psychology. The JEPS Bulletin aims to connect psychology students from all over Europe by providing a unique platform for learning and sharing of knowledge, and subsequently, serving as an indispensable companion for students in the process of conducting and reporting psychological research. The JEPS Bulletin is proud to have a great number of active Contributors who are psychology students throughout Europe. Currently, the JEPS Bulletin is recruiting new Contributors so in case you want to be part of the list on your left keep reading.

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Why meta-analysis? A guide through basic steps and common biases

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 Meta: meta- combining form. From Greek meta ‘with, across, or after.’  Pertaining to a level above or beyond.

 Analysis: analysis |əˈnaləsis| noun. From Greek analuō ‘I unravel,  investigate’. Detailed examination of the elements or structure of  something,
 
Often times, researchers and students find themselves going through a  dense amount of papers on a certain topic only to find results that don’t  really seem to point towards a coherent or homogenous conclusion. Does this treatment work?
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A Change of View: Using Visual Methods to Explore Experience in Qualitative Research

creative-brain

The topic of this bulletin arose from a talk given by Dr. Anna Bagnoli, who had used a variety of visual methods in addition to verbal interviews in order to holistically study young people’s identities.  Intrigued by the question of how such data could be collected and analysed to contribute to understandings of psychological topics, the author of this post recently carried out an interview with Dr. Bagnoli on behalf of the Open University Psychological Society (Rouse, 2013).  In this bulletin post the author will share what she has learnt from this interview and by researching the use of visual methods to explore experience and meaning.

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Unpaid Psychology Positions – A Graduate’s Perspective

For a present-day psychology graduate it can sometimes seem like one has entered the profession at the wrong time. Last year shone a glaring spotlight on fraud and misconduct in scientific research, the Reproducibility Project and Psych File Drawer began to prise open a lack of replication in psychological literature, and there was criticism and concern over an increasing number of unpaid research assistant/assistant psychologist jobs in the U.K. However this self-reflection and criticism should be seen as an opportunity for correction, and ultimately, a gradual change within the profession.

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Life is a box of chocolates

Sitting in a classroom and being lectured, I often felt a sense that I should not question what I am being taught. This was not due to any fault of the lecturers who mostly were very welcoming of students’ opinions. However, simply knowing that this was an area that they had spent years researching and seeing them sharing at their computers screen, or head in a book every time you look through their office window gave the sense that they must have all the answers and have a justified reason for their opinions whereas mine always felt too subjective to be taken seriously. During my undergraduate degree, my essays became more and more focused on the areas which we had been taught in class and less inclusive of the breath of what were my own opinions. This was simply because having a controversial argument seemed to lead to more frustration in conceiving the lecturer’s than arguing what was the ‘popular’ approach.

 

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