Category Archives: Science & Policy

Even though scientists are often lost in the ivory tower of their scientific work, academic research in any discipline – and especially psychology – is tightly connected to the society. It contributes to the improvement of the living conditions in the society. It supports the decision-making process of policy-makers by providing evidence on what works and what doesn’t. And it is paid for by the society.

In an attempt to ensure that this natural relationship between science and the society is always well-balanced, we make policies – governmental policies, international policies, institutional policies. The field at the interplay between science and policy-making – very intuitively coined ‘science policy’ – therefore concerns itself with managing the allocation of resources for the conduct of scientific research towards the goal of best serving the public interest.

This section of JEPS will focus on providing background, and potentially some answers, on a few interesting questions about the relationship between science and policy. How do the mechanisms of public funding for science work, including research grants? And what are the biggest ones in Europe that every researcher should have in their vocabulary? Should we fund basic research or only applications that drive innovation and economic growth? Are the EU policies evidence-based? And what are the jobs for academics in evidence-based policy-making? How important is it to communicate our science to the public – and why?

There will be blogposts, interviews, and further reading materials. Contributions are very welcome!

Between science and policy: an interview with Dr Toby Wardman

Even though scientists are oftentimes lost in the ivory towers of their scientific work, academic research in any discipline – and especially psychology – is tightly connected to the society. It contributes to the improvement of the living conditions in the population. It supports the decision-making process of policy-makers with scientific evidence. And it is paid for by the tax-payers’ money. In an attempt to ensure that this natural relationship between science and society is always well-balanced, we make policies – governmental policies, international policies, institutional policies. The field at the interplay between science and policy-making – very intuitively coined ‘science policy’ – therefore concerns itself with topics such as the allocation of resources for scientific research, the careers of scientists, and the systems of efficient communication between scientists and policy-makers (Pielke, 2005). Continue reading

Karla Matić

Karla Matić is a psychology graduate of University of Leuven with interests in cognitive neuroscience, large-scale neuroimaging methodology, and science policy. She is currently an intern in the European Research Council (ERC) in Brussels. If she didn't aspire for an academic career, she would be running a book-café on a small Croatian island.

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